Who Was Sylvia Morales?

This is Sylvia Morales and Lou Reed at their wedding. Looks like Steve Rubell and William Burroughs in the background, but who knows?
This is Sylvia Morales and Lou Reed at their wedding. Looks like Steve Rubell and William Burroughs in the background, but who knows?

Last Sunday we found out that Lou Reed had died after what seems like a difficult battle with liver disease, and a predictable flood of obituaries followed, paying tribute to a “rock original,” a musician credited with laying the groundwork for what would become punk rock. While that genre has been characterized by nihilistic excess (or some might say righteous anger), Reed’s roots contribution was syncretizing literary inspiration (his mentor, Delmore Schwarz) with a bipolar attack of light melodies and dark discordance.

Back in the early late 90s, when you could still afford to go to a trendy Downtown restaurant, I was trying to impress a new girlfriend, so I took her to Indochine across the street from the Public Theater. Suddenly, a couple of booths down, Lou Reed and Laurie Anderson appeared. It was the first time I’d known they were dating. I had always thought she was the bomb, from back when she was playing those tape loops on her violin. Seems like they were a great couple.

But before there was Laurie–a shadowy ex-rock critic for the Village Voice once told me in his East Village tenement living room–there was Sylvia Morales, whom Lou married in the early ’80s. When I saw the above photo of her, I experienced a shock of recognition–we share a last name, and she looks like she could be my cousin. Various sources refer to her as a British designer, a writer, and an “alleged stripper and part-time dominatrix.”  While this piece in Slate examines the well-documented rumor that Reed was bisexual, he had such a thing for Sylvia that in “Heavenly Arms,” a song written about her (he repeats her name 5x in the chorus), he proclaims that “only a woman can love a man.”

Reed may have been strung out waiting for his man on Lexington 125, or still reeling from the legendary electro-shock therapy he was subjected to for the purpose of shocking him straight, but it seems it was Sylvia who showed him that, like Roxy Music said, “love is the drug.”

“In a world full of hate/Love should never wait,” he serenaded her. That was true like 30 years ago, and it’s still true. Maybe even more so now.

Lou Reed triumphed by turning a love for literature and a philosophy about personal alienation into a recording career. He’s a Brooklyn OG who will be missed. But I’ve always wondered, who was Sylvia? Wish we had a chance to ask Lou before he left us.

8 Comments

Add yours →

  1. Reblogged this on Gina Vergel and commented:
    Interesting post about Lou Reed’s ex gf.

  2. I met Sylvia several couple times. Shy, sweet, thoughtful,intelligent, — of course, she could have been a dominatrix. But on the street she was elegant, gentle, Lou’s opposite in many ways. And of course, model beautiful. They seemed a happy couple, tgo I rarely saw them together.

  3. Women especially minority women were pretty invisible back then. She could have been a poet or musician but nobody was listening.

  4. Sylvia and a friend of hers lived across the hall from me at Pratt Institute, before I moved out of the dorm. We hung out, they said I was a female Jagger, which made me laugh. Sylvia and I both majored in film. She was a lot of fun. She wasn’t a poet or musician, though I was, and am. She was an artist, also, but she got into stripping at clubs, that’s where she met Lou, and left school before graduating, because all she wanted to do was marry Lou, which I didn’t get, as a goal in life, although Lou Reed had always been an inspiration as a musician and an artist. To so many people, around the world. One of the short 8mm films I did then was of her, she was enchantingly beautiful.

  5. That’s Garland Jefferys in the background. He collaborated with Lou a few times.

  6. I knew Sylvia in college. She was in the film department a year behind me and i saw her at various parties. She used to strip at the Melody Burlesque, where Lou saw her for the first time and fell in love.

  7. I rented Lou’s property in Hardwick from Sylvia. She was an incredibly snobby and disgustingly terrible landlady. Had a young, pale, greasy “bf” who looked as though he never saw daylight. Very strange people altogether.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: